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Move First, Think Later: Sense and Nonsense in Improving Your Chess

Move First, Think Later: Sense and Nonsense in Improving Your Chess

Playing chess can be confronting, and it sure helps if you can look with a smile at your own performances. I have known some players with a longing for perfection­ ism, who couldn't accept their shortcomings and quit playing .

The term 'confrontation' in a sentence like 'playing chess confronts us with the working of our brain' seems a bit strange. But, although it's our own brain, we don't seem to have great access to it. This well-known fact is a major theme (prob­ lem) in the whole history of the philosophical and psychological investigations of our cognitive powers.

This free ebook wants to be an inquiry into these and related questions. A lot of theories and books about our thinking and about improving in chess will be reviewed, with the emphasis on their cognitive aspects.

If you do the exercises, you will learn the most from this book. Some may say: you will learn at least something. There is a fair chance that not everyone will endorse the points of view that are developed in this book - to a considerable extent they conflict with the doctrines of mainstream chess didactics. Although the author isn't a French philosopher, he does prefer claiming the opposite rather than putting for­ ward some small refinement.

The chess fragments in this book are carefully selected. Since they are not pre­ sented as examples of some bigger principle or truth, they should be able to speak for themselves.

No board is needed to play over these fragments. Almost all of them comprise a diagram and just a few moves, so everyone with some skill in visualisation will be able to follow them, lying on a couch or in some other preferred position.

Read book online on Google Docs Move First, Think Later: Sense and Nonsense in Improving Your Chess

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